Let’s Take a Tour through my Tackle Box

 

This is the gear that goes on most every fishing trip.

This is the gear that goes on most every fishing trip.

Time to take a virtual walk through my tackle box, and my other fishing gear! I have a lot of tackle in my box so I’m ready for whatever the fish decide to throw at me. Sometimes it doesn’t matter what you have in your tackle box you just can’t get them to bite. However if you have a wide array of tackle you will almost always be able to catch something. I am a huge believer in light tackle. I have caught arm loads of fish on light tackle and it makes almost any catch exciting. Fishing with light tackle doesn’t mean you can’t catch big fish just means it is going to more exciting when you do!

This is obviously not all of the fishing gear that I own, but it is the gear that is most constant on every fishing adventure that I embark on. Let me start to break down the two soft sided boxes that you see in the picture. I will start with my bait binder that I use to carry my soft plastics.

Soft sided bait binder I use for my soft plastic baits.

Soft sided bait binder I use for my soft plastic baits.

            I used to carry all my baits in one box, but the soft plastics can tend to take up a lot of room so I separated them. I like having them separated because it makes it easier for me to keep my tackle organized. Having them separated also means that when I am soft plastic fishing I can take only the bait Binder and leave the other tackle behind; although that doesn’t happen very often. Inside the bait wallet I keep offset worm hooks of various sizes, several different types of weights, and of course the plastics.

The contents of my bait binder

The contents of my bait binder

Above is a picture of what is contained in my bait wallet. The plastics you see are some of the more productive baits that I fish with; you might say my favorites for bass! One of my favorite ways to rig my plastic baits is on a drop shot rig. The drop shot rig allows you work the plastic very slow while keeping the bait off the bottom. The drop shot can also be worked around cover when rigged weed less on the offset worm hook. Here is a link to a video of how to rig a drop shot.

HOW TO RIG A DROP SHOT

Pliers, twister tails, split shots, and various hooks

This is my main tackle box.
Pole rest, and stringer

Pole rest, and stringer

This is my main tackle box.

  Now let’s move onto my bigger tackle box which contains a wider array of goodies to ensure that I can always target whatever kind of fish may be biting. It is for certain, and is quite obvious that I really enjoy fishing for bass in our local waters, but please don’t be fooled I fish for every species that swims in our waters. I will start with the top of the box, and will work my way down. I keep the stuff that I want easily accessible on the top of my box such as swivels, and jig heads, and my favorite inline spinner bait. In the smaller pockets on the sides and in the front I keep an array of hooks, sinkers, and twister tails I also keep my stringer and pole rest in the smaller pockets. I keep my pliers, and my measuring tape/scale attached to the outside of my tackle box with a lanyard so they are easily accessible at all times.

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            When you dive into the big part of my tackle box you find four separate boxes, which are all filled with artificial baits that can be used to target everything from Bass to Muskie. I will share with you some of my favorites, but I will be covering more how to use them in a later articles.

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            Box number one contains all crank baits of different varieties of course, diving lures, top water lures, and just about everything in between.

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            Box number two is full of offset spinner baits, and buzz baits, some of favorite baits in late summer and fall.

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            Box number three contains some overflow, more crank baits, some tadpole lures, some bigger lures I use when targeting musky.

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            Box number four last but certainly not least contains my top water frogs which are absolutely priceless when you come up on a pond that is completely inundated with pond scum. This box also contains a little more overflow one can never have too much tackle!

DSCF4410Above is a selection of some of my favorite lures these are some of my most productive lures. I have found though that every lure has it’s day!

            I know quite a few people that have big guide fishing boxes and I myself am not a fan. When you hike to a lot of your fishing spots like I do it is important to be able to easily carry your stuff. This is why I try to keep all my stuff in smaller easy to carry boxes, and I also utilize stuff like a magnetic net release, and fishing rod sling.

Rod sling allows me to hike with my hands free.

Rod sling allows me to hike with my hands free.

Net with magnetic release allows me to attach the net to my hat and simply give a tug when I need it.

Net with magnetic release allows me to attach the net to my hat and simply give a tug when I need it.

No matter the box or lure you are using the most important piece of tackle is to enjoy every minute that you are on the water, or by the water’s edge. I have said it many times before fishing isn’t always about catching fish, just get out there and have fun with your family that is what it is really all about!

 

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