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Machine achieve playoff spot with 14-10 victory

The Ohio Machine finished their 2014 regular season with a win in what was announced as “the most important game of the franchise.”

The 14-10 victory over the Florida Launch propels them into the playoffs; their next game will be August 16 against the Rochester Rattlers in Rochester, New York.

“Going to the playoffs is an incredible experience for our guys and a good opportunity; we’re not just going to be happy just getting there, I mean that’s not the way we’ve approached this whole season,” said head coach Bear Davis.

“We’re going up there on a mission…to win, to win every inch we get.”

Attacker Marcus Holman scores the Machine's first goal in the game.

Attacker Marcus Holman scores the Machine’s first goal in the game.

Leading the Machine’s offense were Attackers Steele Stanwick and Marcus Holman, with three and four goals each.

“It’s just a great win overall, nice team victory,” Stanwick said.

“I don’t think we played our best overall, it’s so nice to get a little win to get our momentum going in the playoffs.”

The Machine jumped out in the first quarter, scoring four times in less than five minutes of play and then adding four more points in the second, putting the Launch down 8-4 at halftime.

“We were just trying to play four minutes at a time, just try to get ourselves regrouped, and win the next four minutes, we don’t look back too much,” said Coach Davis.

“It’s not really a good habit to get into, looking back, we’re just trying to keep moving forward.”

Referees review the Machine's second goal, which was challenged by the Launch but upheld.

Referees review the Machine’s second goal, which was challenged by the Launch but upheld.

Their practice of focusing on only the current four minutes would pay off after the third quarter, when the Launch landed three goals to the Machine’s one, narrowing the score to 9-7.

The Machine definitively pulled ahead in the final quarter – the Launch made it to within two points again early on, but the Machine’s responding pair of goals ensured they would need to make several unanswered points to at least force overtime.

Between the Machine’s continued offensives and the clock, the Launch never had the chance to get past three points down after that.

The Machine offense celebrates after their 12th goal.

The Machine offense celebrates after their 12th goal.

“Every team in this league is talented, and the games for the most part are close, two or three goal games,” Holman said afterwards.

“We just stuck with it, got on a little roll there in the fourth quarter, and finished them out, our defense did a great job on that.”

“I think we did a good job studying up on them, they were a little different than when we played them the first time, but our coaches gave us some good film so we could watch that, study up. I thought we executed pretty well,” said goalie Brian Phipps.

The Machine played the Launch previously on May 10 but lost 10-9.

Attacker Peter Baum charges off the sideline before scoring the final Machine goal to clinch the win.

Attacker Peter Baum charges off the sideline before scoring the final Machine goal to clinch the win.

“We set (the playoffs) as a goal, and there were times this season where we looked good and times we didn’t look so good but I thought we did a great job sticking together as a team and our core has done a great job of supporting each other and it feels good to make it,” Holman said.

“I think we just wanted to take care of business,” Stanwick added.

“We weren’t really worried about anything else, we just wanted to have a good game tonight for us and just take care of it and control our own destiny.”

“Our first team meeting we said, we’re no longer an expansion team, we can play with the best of them, we got the weapons to do it so let’s go out and prove we can win,” Phipps finished.

“We thought we could be here and now our next step in the chapter is to win the next round and go on to Georgia.”

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Delaware’s Car Theft Suspect In Custody After Manhunt: Photos From The Scene

On August 4, Police Officers from the Delaware Police Department, Delaware County Sheriff’s Office, Ohio State Patrol and Columbus Police, as well as members of the Delaware Fire Department, responded to pursue a suspect who fled from a stolen vehicle in the area of Curtis Street’s 400 block.

The suspect was described as a white male, 5’7” , 140 lbs., with short blond hair; he was believed to be barefoot and the city cautioned residents not to approach anyone matching his description.

At 6:15 p.m. it was reported he was in custody. DelawareO will provide more information as it becomes available.

Continuing

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All photos are by Spenser Hickey – DelawareO.com, all rights reserved.

A Lasting Tradition: Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce Promotes Opportunity in Local Manufacturing

Holly Quaine, President of the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce. Photo courtesy of the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce.

Holly Quaine, President of the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce. Photo courtesy of the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce.

While the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce (DACC) is located on Sandusky Street, one of their leading quality of life programs occurs near the edge of city limits.

They work with local middle schools to organize field trips to the industrial park on Pittsburgh Drive, says DACC President Holly Quaine.

“We’ll take them down to Pittsburgh Drive and show them really cool, sexy, high paying, high tech manufacturing,” Quaine said.

“These kids didn’t even know Pittsburgh Drive exists. They’ll go through Federal Heath and they’ll see a sign that says Texas (Roadhouse) being made right there here in Delaware that they’re going to see driving down the road; they’re going to go eat at Texas Roadhouse.”

The children they focus on have been identified by the school as less likely to attend a traditional four-year college or join the military, so showing them the presence of manufacturing work is beneficial all around, as there’s a growing labor gap due to retirement.

“If you’re a machinist, you can write your ticket anywhere,” Quaine said.

Delaware will have increased openings due to the newly approved expansion to the Sawmill Industrial Park, which will open up 1600 acres over the next 25 to 30 years.

“We are so good at light manufacturing that there’s a real hungry market to come here but what we lack is infrastructure ready property,” Quaine said.

Delaware’s manufacturing base grew out of small shops – “boutique manufacturers” as Quaine calls them – and so they’ve been able to recover from the recession in ways many places have not, including Quaine’s former home north of Detroit.

The economic development there was based on automotive manufacturing, and when the recession struck unemployment levels reached 25 percent.

She doesn’t see that happening here, though.

“Delaware’s base is so diverse that it is unlikely that the closing of any one business is going to paralyze the community, and there’s some really cool stuff going on in the industrial park,” she said.

Some examples she gave include AHP, which manufactures one billion diapers a year in Delaware; Engineered Material Systems, which makes magnetic glue for solar panels and Sky Climber Scaffolding, operating factories in 64 countries.

This quality of life program is one of several approaches the Chamber uses to promote business growth, particularly for small businesses.

“We can collectively do what no business can do alone,” Quaine said.

They do have large businesses among their 412 members, though, including OhioHealth; their reach goes beyond Delaware city – their second highest member demographic is in the Columbus area.

“They’re based in Columbus but they do business in Delaware so our thinking is very big and very broad,” Quaine said.

“It’s not at all just Delaware city, although obviously we work very well with the city but we really think county first.”

One example of a DACC area of interest – which goes beyond the county level – is sewer policy, which has a regional impact on business development.

The DACC’s operations in these areas are handled by specific task forces; there are three – infrastructure, business development and quality of life. They are overseen by Quaine and a Board of Directors selected each year.

As a 501(c)(6) organization independent from local government, they are not tax-exempt and don’t directly receive tax funding or charitable donations – Quaine lists all of these as common misconceptions regarding the Chamber.

The Delaware Area Chamber is not a member of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, but is accredited by them and received a four-star rating from them last November, placing them in the top three percent nationally.

Additional services they offer include a safety council program, in partnership with the Bureau of Worker’s Compensation, and a nine month business leadership program.

Their leadership program, the only one in the county, is very prestigious – “think Eagle Scout for Chamber members,” Quaine said.

They also hold four networking events each month, including luncheons featuring elected officials and economic development professionals.

To learn more about the DACC, see: http://www.delawareareachamber.com/.

City Council again delays vote on Elks demolition

First Ward Councilman Chris Jones bows his head during discussion on whether to demolish the historic Elks Building on 110 N. Sandusky Street

First Ward Councilman Chris Jones bows his head during discussion on whether to demolish the historic Elks Building on 110 N. Sandusky Street

After hearing additional information from county officials and further opposition from city residents supporting preservation, the Council declined to vote on whether they would allow demolition of the Elks Building on North Sandusky Street as part of the County’s new courthouse design.

A key concern, particularly for Councilman Jones, was that preserving the Elks Building at the expense of a new courthouse could lead the County to build a larger courthouse facility outside of the downtown, which would draw many local law offices out of that area.

Related: Council delays vote on Elks Building demolition and more, from June 26

Delaware County Juvenile Court Administrator David Hejmanowski also expressed this concern after the floor was opened to public comment preceding the decision not to vote.

He added that even if Council voted against demolition, he feared the Elks Building would “sit there and rot,” leading to demolition by neglect.

Opponents, including Larry and Marian Vance, respectively a masonry restoration contractor and president of Preservation Ohio, again focused on the house’s historic nature and argued for greater efforts to build the courthouse around or incorporate it’s facade into the courthouse.

Larry Vance takes notes before speaking; he and his wife Marian (to his right) both spoke to oppose demolition of the Elks Building.

Larry Vance takes notes before speaking; he and his wife Marian (to his right) both spoke to oppose demolition of the Elks Building.

Third Ward Councilman Joe DiGenova also asked about whether elements of the facade could be used in the new courthouse design, and the County’s architect, Steve Kenat of GBBN Architects, said they’re looking at taking cues from it.

Kenat said that incorporating the physical front of the Elks Building would conflict with the parking garage behind the courthouse and their plans to use the new courthouse to create better access to the Hayes Building regarding court security.

“The new courts building shouldn’t necessarily be held hostage by the presence of a 100-year old home adjacent to it,” said Kenat.

Architect Steve Kenat holds a sticker up showing that, earlier in the day, he attended a community meeting in Cincinnati supporting preservation of a historic museum, there in an effort to show his opponents that he understood their concerns.

Architect Steve Kenat holds a sticker up showing that, earlier in the day, he attended a community meeting in Cincinnati supporting preservation of a historic museum, there in an effort to show his opponents that he understood their concerns.

“It’s not that we as Commissioners are trying to tear down the history of Delaware city, we’re trying to find a compromise that allows us to save – I believe, and I can only speak for myself – buildings of historical value that are still in a condition to be saved,” said County Commissioner Gary Merrell, President of the Commissioners.

After a long period of discussion and questions between Council members, County staff and local residents, Fourth Ward Councilman Andrew Brush requested the fifth reading at the next meeting on August 11.

Following this, Brush and City Manager Tom Homan commented on the landmark importance of the Sawmill Parkway expansion, but citizens’ attendance had dwindled to three, excluding Commissioner Merrell, after the Elks Building discussion was temporarily settled.

The attendance dwindled after the Elks Building discussion was tabled; most seats were filled then.

The attendance dwindled after the Elks Building discussion was tabled; most seats were filled then.

Other matters discussed and voted on included ordinances for rezoning of Forman Insurance Agency at 377 E. William Street, a permit for the city to make improvements to the Public Works facility, and appropriations ordinances to compensate the Clerk of Council and remove two low head dams on the Olentangy River.

Community Development Manager Shari Thomas, of Girl Scouts of Ohio, gave a presentation on “The State of Girls” and their efforts to promote inclusivity and work with area schools, following the Pledge of Allegiance being led by Girl Scouts of various local troops.

Shari Thomas of Girl Scouts of Ohio's Heartland Council gives her presentation on "State of Girls" and leadership.

Shari Thomas of Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland Council gives her presentation on “State of Girls” and leadership.

Peggy Guenther also provided input on the Dog Park committee during the public comment portion of the Council meeting. Ohio Wesleyan University’s chaplain Jon Powers opened the meeting with an invocation celebrating and seeking harmony as conflicts continue in Ukraine, Gaza and around the world.

“God of every faith and every face, we pause to ponder in amazing grace, that in this world so whirled about by war, we can meet here in this place of peace,” he said.

Ohio Wesleyan's Chaplain Powers begins to read his invocation at the start of the meeting.

Ohio Wesleyan’s Chaplain Powers begins to read his invocation at the start of the meeting.

Machine July 26, 2014 Game in Picutres.

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Unless otherwise marked, photos by DelawareO photographer Spenser Hickey and are not to be republished without permission.

Click this link to read the Machine Game recap by Arden Palmquist.

Council approves Liberty Casting expansion, JEDD negotiation and more

Delaware Police Chaplain Jeff Slider reads a prayer at the start of the meeting.

Delaware Police Chaplain Jeff Slider reads a prayer at the start of the meeting.

While 16 ordinances were brought up for consideration or public reading at the July 14th city council meeting, just six were approved; the rest will be voted on at future meetings.

The first ordinance on the agenda, one that’s drawn significant public attention, concerned potential demolition of the Elks Building as part of a new Delaware County courthouse. The relevant ordinance was held over for a fourth reading on July 28th, where county officials will provide updated information to Council.

Two of the ordinances which were approved concerned an expansion to Liberty Casting, supported by the City Planning Department.

Delaware resident Marilyn Nims speaks to the City Council.

Delaware resident Marilyn Nims speaks to the City Council.

During public comment on the ordinance, Delaware resident Marilyn Nims read a letter to council concerning noxious odors she believes come from the plant ‒ an issue that was also raised during previous public debate on the ordinance.

At the Council meeting June 23, Liberty Casting CEO Jerry Harmeyer said that their procedures are in EPA compliance and that the company uses affordable filtration systems; Harmeyer was at the July 14 meeting but did not make a public comment.

Second Ward Councilwoman Lisa Keller noted that she’d observed the odor, but after discussing the matter with City Attorney Darren Shulman said the issue should be handled separately.

Berkshire Trustee Bill Holtry (left) and Administrator Jeff George (right) address the Delaware City Council.

Berkshire Trustee Bill Holtry (left) and Administrator Jeff George (right) address the Delaware City Council.

The council also approved an ordinance authorizing City Manager Tom Homan to negotiate with representatives of Berkshire Township and the Village of Sunbury on entering a Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) to oversee a planned Tanger/Simon outlet mall.

The JEDD was also an issue that had been discussed previously at Council, and Berkshire Trustee Chairman Bill Holtry, Administrator Jeff George and Sunbury Mayor Tommy Hatfield returned to Delaware to discuss the ordinance with City Council.

Other ordinances approved by Council included appropriations ordinances to fund an Economic Development Specialist position and provide funding to increase the depth of Mingo Park’s Jack Florance Pool.

Council also voted to remove compensation for the Civil Service Commission, which the Commission had agreed with.

Ordinances scheduled for additional readings involve Sawmill Parkway, a Community Reinvestment Area Agreement with Henkel Corporation, a comprehensive plan and rezoning agreement with Forman Insurance Agency and a permit for the city to store flammable liquid at an East William Street lot owned by the city.

Chief Bruce Pijanowski (seated) introduces Officers Brett Simon, Kyle Tomlin and John Needham.

Chief Bruce Pijanowski (seated) introduces Officers Brett Simon, Kyle Tomlin and John Needham.

The Council was also introduced to three new Delaware police officers ‒ John Needham, Kyle Tomlin and Brent Simon. Sergeant Adam Willauer was on vacation and unable to attend.

Council members also surprised Vonie DiGenova, wife of Third Ward Councilman Joe DiGenova, with a presentation honoring her 37 years of service as a teacher at Willis Intermediate School.

According to Councilman DiGenova, she’d been told he was receiving a city proclamation in order to get her to attend.

“Your husband told you a little white lie,” said Mayor Carolyn Kay Riggle.

After receiving the proclamation, Vonie DiGenova described her students, many of whom had autism.

“They were the sweetest and most adorable loving children,” she said, encouraging the audience to donate for autism research.

Vonie DiGenova receives the city proclamation from Mayor Riggle while her husband applauds.

Vonie DiGenova receives the city proclamation from Mayor Riggle while her husband applauds.

 

Turning Hair Into Hope

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When sixty Delaware residents sat down outside Son of Thurman’s last Saturday, they had a variety of hairdos; when they stood up they were all bald.

They gave up their hair, but almost $23,000 is going to the bank to help St. Baldrick’s Foundation in the fight against childhood cancer because they did.

14 teams, including representatives of the Delaware City Police and Fire Departments and County EMS, took part.

The main leader at the event, though, was area resident Joanie Daly, who planned it and donated her hair as well, raising $8,365 through community support.

“In my daughter’s play group, a little boy named Jacob was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and I decided to shave my head in solidarity with him,” she said.

Daly had hoped to get 20 people to take part; having three times as many was a surprise.

“It exceeded my expectations by far,” she said.

She gathered participants and created teams by going around town and recruiting them in person; she’d been working since the start of the year.

“It took about ten hour of work a week,” she said.

She decided on Son of Thurman because she’d heard it had just opened and had a lot of local attention.

“There was a lot of buzz about this restaurant so I thought it’d get even more attention if we did it here at Son of Thurman,” she said. “I asked Chris DeVol and he said ‘Absolutely’ and we just did it.”

St. Baldrick’s was founded in 2000 and draws its name from “St. Patrick” and “bald.”

According to their website, St. Baldrick’s has held fundraisers in 23 nations, gathering more than $127 million to fund 711 grant projects in the fight against cancer.

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In Pictures – Delaware, Ohio 4th of July Fireworks 2014

Miss the Ohio Machine’s fireworks show? Please feel free to share this with your family and friends. If you share a picture on social media please link to this page with credit given to Spenser Hickey at www.DelawareO.com. Pictures may not be reproduced or used for commercial purposes without permission.

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Council delays vote on Elks Building demolition and more.

Delaware City Council Meeting – June, 23, 2014

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The historic Elks Building at 110 N. Sandusky Street. Photo by Spenser Hickey.

Delaware’s historic past and possible future clashed at this week’s City Council meeting, with council members caught in the middle.

The public debate –
[Read more…]

City Council discusses joint economic development, approves public hearings on expansions and demolition

Patriotism was a leading topic at the start of this week’s City Council meeting, with a Pledge of Allegiance led by Girl Scout Troop 2429 and an official proclamation honoring local resident Lt. Col. Jeanne LaFountain for her five tours – four of them overseas – in the Air Force.

Delaware City Council - June 9, 2014 IMG_0107

“Mayor Carolyn Kay Riggle (left center) presents Lt. Col. Jeanne LaFountain with a city proclamation honoring her for her service”

Lt. Col. LaFountain’s latest deployment, which ended recently, was in Afghanistan, where she served in 445th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron based at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton.

She doesn’t plan to stop any time soon, either.

“I’ll keep (serving) as long as the good Lord gives me the ability and the health to,” she said.

“During her deployments, Lt. Col LaFountain served with honor on medical operations missions, helping to treat and transport wounded warriors out of harm’s way to their waiting families,” Mayor Carolyn Kay Riggle said while reading the proclamation.

“I am honored and humbled to receive this type of recognition, I am just one person among thousands who are out there helping to defend the freedoms that you so much enjoy. I am honored and privileged to be able to transport the young men and women who have become ill or injured during their defense of this country to the next level of care,” LaFountain said in her response.

In other news, the Council discussed at length a potential joint economic development between Sunbury Village, Berkshire Township and the city of Delaware regarding retail and office centers to be built in Delaware County; administrators of Sunbury and Berkshire attended and took questions from Delaware council members.

The Council also approved several upcoming public hearings to take place next week, including improvements to Hayes High School, potential demolition of the Elks Building at 110 N Sandusky Street as part of courthouse expansions, expansions to Liberty Casting on Liberty Road and expansions for a property owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints at 15 Rock Creek Drive.

The hearing on potential demolition of the Elks Building will be at 7:15 p.m.; Hayes High School will be at 7:30 p.m.; Rock Creek Drive expansion at 7:35 p.m. and Liberty Casting at 7:40 p.m. – all will be in Council chambers at 1 S Sandusky St Monday June 23.